Ecology monks in Thailand seek to end environmental suffering

first_imgAt a time when Pope Francis is calling upon religious leaders to step up as environmental advocates, Thai Buddhist monks are answering the call. Through rituals like tree ordinations, monks are integrating Buddhist principles into the environmental movement in order to garner support from their followers and encourage sustainable practices.Although Buddhism is typically a religion famed for its detachment from society, ecology monks believe that their religion is inherently tied to nature.With such an immense amount of influence in villages throughout Thailand, Buddhist monks are utilizing their position to add a unique moral dimension to the environmental movement. However, rituals alone are not enough. As development in Thailand is increasing, so is deforestation. Acres of forests are cleared for contract farming, habitats are torn down to make room for new factories, and soil is eroded, causing massive flooding during the rainy season.But amid the environmental wreckage, some trees remain untouched. These trees are wrapped in iconic bright orange robes and deemed sacred, protected from harm and destruction. These trees have been ordained as monks.At a time when Pope Francis is calling upon religious leaders to step up as environmental advocates, Thai Buddhist monks are answering the call. Through rituals like tree ordinations, some monks in Thailand are integrating Buddhist principles into the environmental movement in order to garner support from their followers and encourage sustainable practices.Dr. Susan Darlington, professor of anthropology and Asian studies at Hampshire College in the U.S. and author of the book The Ordination of a Tree, explains that protecting trees is a form of merit-making, an important practice in Buddhism. By accumulating merit through performing good deeds, Buddhists are ensuring a better next life and taking a step closer to reaching enlightenment and, ultimately, Nirvana.An ordained tree wrapped in the orange robes of a Buddhist monk found in a forest of Chiang Mai, Thailand. Image by Kiley Price.“Making merit is extremely important for Thai Buddhists,” Dr. Darlington said. “They see [tree ordination ceremonies] as an act of making merit, which can help with rebirth and, in some cases, having a better life now.”One of the primary goals in the Buddhist religion is to end suffering, and the forests of Thailand are certainly suffering.“There are places in Northern Thailand, particularly in Nan Province, where there has been a lot of deforestation, so the watersheds areas fill the water with mud, silt, and pesticide runoff causing more severe flooding in the rainy season and more severe drought in the dry season,” said Gordon Congdon, the Conservation Program Manager for WWF-Thailand. “In many ways, climate change is amplifying problems that are already existing.”Leaders of SocietyWith over 90 percent of the Thai population practicing Buddhism, monks hold an influential role as leaders to whom people look for guidance in all aspects of life.“They become the leader that people would trust,” said Dr. Chaya Vaddhanaphuti, a geography professor at Chiang Mai University whose PhD studies focused on climate change. “If I asked the farmers who they would choose to trust between government officers and the monks, they would choose the latter.”A young Thai girl follows three novice monks in the collection of the morning alms, in which they accept donations of food and drink to the temple from residents throughout the village of Chonburi. Photo by Kiley Price.With such an immense amount of influence in villages throughout Thailand, monks are utilizing their position to add a unique moral dimension to the environmental movement. However, rituals alone are not enough.Although Buddhism is typically a religion famed for its detachment from society, ecology monks believe that their religion is inherently tied to nature. Buddhist monks like Phrakhu Ajan Somkit, who is based in Nan Province in northern Thailand where deforestation is an issue of major concern, are entering the political sphere to consult with government officials on environmental initiatives and rights for rural farmers. Other monks, like Phrakhu Win Mektripop, an ecology monk based in Bangkok, are trying to find more sustainable solutions to everyday problems by implementing solar panels in temples and helping villagers create cheap huts out of mud and natural materials.“When the Buddha was born, he was born under the tree. He was enlightened under the tree. His first sermon was under the tree. We can see that most of his life was related to the forest,” said Phra Win. With a master’s degree in environmental economics from Chulalongkorn University, Phra Win understands how important agriculture is to the rural population of Thailand.As Thailand shifted from a low-income to an upper-income society in less than a generation, however, sustainability hasn’t exactly been the focus of the country’s economic development. For instance, big companies like CP All Public, which owns over 10,000 7-Eleven stores in Thailand, are taking advantage of the rapid pace of growth by contracting rural farmers to mass-produce monocrops like maize and rice.A farm in Surin, Thailand, that only plants rice in its many fields. Photo by Kiley Price.“They plant corn, they harvest it, they sell it to the big company and earn just about enough to pay off their debt,” said Congdon. “It creates this vicious cycle of dependency on the large companies and the farmers never get ahead, which leads to more and more deforestation.”Seeing no other options, these farmers continue unsustainable practices that are stripping the soil of valuable nutrients and plunging them deeper into debt. However, ecology monks are working to provide an alternative that is beneficial to both the environment and the people.EducationAnother of the most harmful environmental issues in Thailand is simply a lack of knowledge.“When I lived with the farmers during my PhD studies, they never used the term climate change,” said Dr. Vaddhanaphuti. “However, they knew that the climate had changed from how it was affecting their farms.”Phrakhu Sangkom Thanapanyo Khunsuri, an ecology monk, at his farm in Surin, Thailand, where he follows the philosophy of sufficiency economy by planting many different types of crops. Photo by Kiley Price.In order to help teach rural farmers about the environment, Phrakhu Sangkom Thanapanyo Khunsuri, a prominent ecology monk based in Chiang Mai, developed an alternative farming school through his temple in Chonburi called the Maab-Euang Meditation Center for Sufficiency Economy. With 49 full-time students this year, Phra Sangkom mixes Buddhist concepts of personal reflection and a theory called “sufficiency economy.” This theory was developed by the previous Thai king, Bhumibol Adulyadej, and encourages subsistence farming, self-sufficiency, and a detachment from material goods.Along with teaching classes at his school and working in the field, Phra Sangkom often travels throughout Surin and Chiang Mai on speaking tours to bring his philosophy directly to the people. Each speech typically has over 100 attendees, he says.Phrakhu Sangkom Thanapanyo Khunsuri giving a speech on the importance of trees and stopping deforestation to the villagers of Surin, Thailand. Photo by Kiley Price.“If the people understand that the jungle gives them oxygen, water, good food, medicine, and clothes, do you think they are going to help protect it?” Phra Sangkom asked as he gestured to his own farm, which was filled with mangoes, bananas, rice, and more. “Of course!”Enemies and AlliesEcology monks like Phra Sangkom have been marked as leading environmental advocates in Thailand, but some have also been marked with a target on their back.Wat Phra That Doi Suthep, a Buddhist temple found at the top of the Doi Suthep Mountain in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Photo by Kiley Price.As their environmental influence spreads throughout Thailand, monks are helping to obtain more community forest rights for indigenous people and farmers, which takes land away from both the government and logging and oil companies. Some monks have been prosecuted by the Thai government for their controversial activism. Others have been assassinated, like Phrakhu Supoj Suvacano, an ecology monk involved in trying to prevent the land around a meditation center in Chiang Mai from being converted into a tangerine farm.Even in the face of these threats, many ecology monks continue their work, which has started to receive help and support from other outlets, like local universities and NGOs.“We are figuring out how we can bring the Buddhists who are just sitting and meditating out into the world to deal with the suffering,” said Somboon Chungprampree, executive director of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists, an organization which is working to connect activist Buddhists and non-Buddhists from all over Asia. “There is not just personal suffering; there is social and environmental suffering out there and people need to figure out how they can help as a Buddhist.”Three monks. Photo by Kiley Price.Kiley Price is a senior at Wake Forest University. Her reporting in Thailand was sponsored by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting in Washington, DC.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Adaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Archive, Buddhism, Climate Change, Climate Change And Food, Conservation, Conservation and Religion, Deforestation, Environment, Farming, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Monocultures, Trees last_img read more

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Genetically Modified foods, crops and seeds should be banned

first_imgDear Editor,The list of countries refusing Monsanto’s Genetically-Modified (GM) crops continues to grow. Highlighting the world divide on the issue, Brazil recently refused all United States grown GM crops. However in Guyana we are continually being force-fed unaware that we are consuming GM foods. They are in approximately 80 per cent of all packaged and conventional foods in grocery stores throughout Guyana. Other countries are refusing to import them, grow them, or even sell them within their borders.As more nations pass laws that impose trade regulations on GM goods, despite World Trade Organization back-room deals, Monsanto and their cut-outs opt for ever-more devious strategies to insinuate their wares onto the world.Despite this, as a Bloomberg article points out: “In recent years, some of the largest commodity trading companies have refused to take certain GMO crops from farmers because the seeds used hadn’t received a full array of global approvals, something that can lead to holdups at ports or even the rejection of entire cargoes.”Take Brazil, for example, chicken farmers won’t feed their birds GM corn; but there are other countries opting out of GM crops, too.Ironically, Brazil is the second largest producer of GM crops in the world after the US, and grows over 20 varieties of GM corn, so they are likely pulling rank for trade rather than hoping to save their population’s health — but at least the chicken farmers see the detriment of using GM corn.This doesn’t mean that a resistance in Brazil isn’t growing as well. Female members of the Landless Worker’s Movement broke into a São Paulo State lab and destroyed millions of samples of GM prototypes not long ago that contained a carcinogenic pesticide.There is a good reason for banning GM crops, even if they are only meant for livestock consumption. A new study says that the very first GM crop, introduced way back in 1996, was highly toxic to farm animals over the long-term.That study produced by a United States research instruction known as Seralini, highlights problems such as “partial paralysis (paresis) accompanied by great fatigue, and problems in the kidneys and mucosal membranes in the animals, followed by death in ten per cent of cases”, all from feeding the animals genially modified feeds. Modified crops such as corn, soy, and alfalfa.Not surprisingly, that study finds that GM maize are the most toxic of all.Can anyone imagine what was and still is being done to the animals’ health since the1990s, and to ourselves and generations to come with the use of GM foods?Fortunately, some Brazilian farmers recently joined a growing, international resistance against cultivating Generically Modified seeds. Russia recently banned all United States corn and soy imports due to possible GM contamination. Nineteen additional countries in the European Union also banned all GM crops, and dozens more have banned GM crops for import or growth in their country.Genetically modified foods or GM foods, also genetically engineered foods, are foods produced from organisms that have had changes introduced into their DNA using the methods of genetic engineering. The genetic engineering techniques allow for the introduction of new traits as well as greater control over traits than previous methods such as selective breeding and mutation breeding.It seems Editor, we are all unsuspected victims unfortunately, of genetically modified foods!The powers that be in Guyana should ban all GM foods, crops and seeds!Yours faithfully,Rooplall Dudhnathlast_img read more

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National awards and rewards: their conception & consequences

first_imgDear Editor,Media reports and other commentaries on the recent award of ‘National Honours’ indicated a hullabaloo of cynicism and apparent boomerang in the public domain regarding the conception, implementation and consequences of this and other typically routine annual rituals. I wish to share some of my own thoughts:Recognition, acknowledgement and celebration of people’s achievements are normally powerful processes to generate and sustain positive behaviour. (Interestingly, Bruce Fogle’s book on “The Dog’s Mind” confirms similar cause & effect correlations in animal behaviour); however, injudicious awards/rewards can have the opposite effect on the many who perceive themselves as equally good, if not better than those who were singled out for the awards. I believe a case can be made for an overhaul of current practices. For a start, I think it will help if the decision-makers can pay more attention to context and what already obtains in order to reduce the unintended fall-outs. A few examples might be helpful here:In the context of people in ‘paid employment’ which as far as I know was the case of the majority in the last list, their differential levels/quality of work are already variously recognised by differentiated compensation, opportunistic promotion and other forms of recognition within their companies/organisations; some employers have other in-house programmes of recognition. It is natural to find some dis-satisfaction with their implementation but mechanisms are in place or can be put in place to resolve these.It is a double-dip for the State to super-impose “National Honours” for paid work. A distinction must be drawn for ‘contractual’, expressed and implied duties and responsibilities in regular employment. For example: a policeman/fireman is paid to save people from crime and fires unlike the neighbour or passer-by who voluntarily does the same things out of good neighbourliness or senses of civic duty/responsibility. Obviously, national honours are more germane to the latter. Similarly, the doctors who save lives by their professional practice are not the same as the numerous, public-spirited citizens who also save lives in other circumstances and by ‘non-medical’ means. Consultants, engineers, lawyers, contractors and businessmen, etc, collect fees, commissions, profits. In the field of professional sports, sportsmen/women compete for selection and are compensated (in some cases extremely handsomely) for excellence and differential performances. In the field of music and literature, commissions and royalties are by no means insignificant. And, it is difficult to resist mentioning the ‘personally profitable’ field of politics so much in vogue these days, where it appears that opportunities for aggrandisement, sycophantic adulation and, as we know only too well in Guyana, pecuniary benefits are unlimited!Another ‘negative’ is the cheapening of National Honours by the excessive numbers awarded: 70 per annum for our tiny population? One wonders what the number is or would be for an average- sized population. However, the main thrust of this letter is that in virtually every sphere of human activity, there are already mechanisms in place that inherently provide the necessary incentives and recognition, thus obviating the need for another layer like our ‘National Awards’ .What is indeed eminently deserving of consideration and attention is a scheme to promote and recognise volunteerism and selflessness especially at the grass-root, community levels where the prime mover for action is altruism and/or where the initiators /participants in community development and individual/social services to the hapless or underprivileged are suitably honoured by the nation for selfless services and altruistic leadership.I, therefore, strongly recommend a thorough review of our National Honours scheme.Sincerely,Nowrang Persaudlast_img read more

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I’ve never come across doping in rugby- Carter

first_img0Shares0000Racing Metro 92 flyhalf Dan Carter was cleared of any wrongdoing in an investigation by the medical commission of the French Rugby Federation on corticosteroids use © AFP/File / Nicolas TucatPARIS, France, Oct 19 – All Blacks great Dan Carter insists he has never come across banned substances in rugby, after himself being cleared in a doping probe.Carter, fellow former All Black Joe Rokococo and Argentinian winger Juan Imhoff, who all play for Racing 92, were the target of an investigation by the medical commission of the French Rugby Federation after testing positive for corticosteroids following last season’s Top 14 final. But the trio, as well as Racing’s medical staff, were all cleared of any wrongdoing.Speaking to franceinfo in an interview, Carter said he had never encountered doping in rugby.“No, never, right throughout my career,” said the fly-half, capped 112 times by New Zealand and a two-time World Cup winner.“I have huge confidence in the authorities that keep this game clean.“I hold my integrity and the game’s integrity at the highest level and I have full trust that the authorities are making sure that this game is kept clean under the anti-doping regulations — and they’ve put a lot of procedures in place to make sure that it is.“I have full confidence our game is played in a clean way and am confident it will continue to be that way for a long time.”– ‘Full trust’ –Carter explained that he had a corticosteroid injection after Racing’s Top 14 semi-final victory over Clermont, when he picked up a swollen knee.“The following two days complete rest and then I was able to play following that,” he said, with him and Rokocoko going on to notch up 20 points between them in Racing’s final win over Toulon.“I have full trust in the medical team and am extremely confident that we stayed within the anti-doping regulations which has been proven we did.”When asked whether he thought others abused the use of corticosteroids, Carter said: “I can’t really speak for other people, other athletes, other rugby players.“For me I had an injury. When you have an injury you want to cure the injury within the anti-doping regulations and that’s exactly what I did.”Carter, who made his debut for the All Blacks in 2003 admitted, however, the temptation might be there given the seismic changes the ever-increasing rate of professionalism brings although he argued that was countered by the staggering advances in the better nurturing of players.“The game has definitely changed, it’s a lot more demanding,” said the world record Test points scorer (1,598).“The players are stronger, the game is faster.“But there’s all the science and understanding behind the game is just so much more advanced than it was 10 years ago.“There are things in terms of our recovery that I wasn’t doing at the start of my career, things like cryotherapy, stretching, massage twice a week, hot and cold baths.”Carter also dismissed talk that players turned out in too many games in France compared to his native New Zealand.“It’s very similar,” the playmaker said. “There’s a long demanding season here. It probably wasn’t helped it was a World Cup year and the season was extended a little bit further.“But I’m very lucky to play for a quality side like Racing where we have a lot of depth. I was managed throughout my season, I was rested for certain games and there wasn’t too much emphasis that I was thrown out there every week.”Carter added: “I’m glad the process has finished and I’m just looking forward to getting back to what I love and that’s playing rugby.“I’m confident that people will read past the headlines and see that I’ve done nothing wrong.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Zambia dethroned, brave Ethiopia exit

first_imgWhile this duo were celebrating progress to the knockout stage, Zambia were packing their bags after becoming the first title-holders since Algeria in 1992 to suffer a first-round exit.The 2012 heroes were left stranded in third place after three successive stalemates, Herve Renard’s side eliminated after a closing goalless draw in Nelspruit against the Burkinabe.Coached by Belgian Paul Put, Burkina Faso’s defence held firm in a tense, tactical affair as Zambia struggled to convert possession for the win they so badly needed.With 11 minutes remaining Zambia were, however, still on course to pip Nigeria for the runners-up spot.With identical points, goal difference and goals scored, they would have gone through by dint of fewer yellow and red cards than Nigeria.That was before Moses popped up to down Ethiopia in the simultaneous match in north-western mining town Rustenburg.“This is a victory for Nigerians where ever they are in the world,” coach Stephen Keshi said.“This is a time for celebration.“Now we face title favourites Ivory Coast in the quarter-finals and there will be no second chance for either side. I have a game plan but, with respect, that is for the players and not for you guys (journalists).”Put had told his men this was their chance to write history for their country — and they didn’t let him down.He added: “They played really well. We expected Zambia to attack and we worked on our defensive tactics for the past two days.“It wasn’t pretty but you have to be realistic in football — the most important thing was to qualify.“When we came here our aim was to do better than in the past, we did that by winning a game and drawing with Nigeria. Now we are in the quarters — this is our biggest achievement.”His team will face the winner of Wednesday’s Group D game between Togo and Tunisia in Nelspruit, while Ethiopia and Zambia head for the airport.Zambia coach Herve Renard cut a dignified figure at the post-match press conference.“It’s better to have won something in your life than always qualify for the quarter-finals but never win anything,” the Frenchman said.“Everybody is sad but my players did their maximum and I’m very proud of them. It’s not the end of the world.“I loved my team tonight. I can’t play with eight defenders, if there is someone who is responsible then it’s me, not my players.”The only low point on an otherwise memorable night for Burkina Faso was the sight of star Alain Traore — leading scorer in the competition with three goals — being stretchered off clutching his left thigh in the opening minutes.Put said: “We’ll wait for the doctor’s report tomorrow (Wednesday), but I hope he will be okay.“When he went off I had to tear up my plan and rethink our strategy.”Captain Charles Kabore said the team had played in memory of goalkeeper Abdoulaye Soulama’s father, who died in a road accident last week.“Abdoulaye’s father was our best supporter and we thought of him before the game.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000NELSPRUIT, South Africa, January 29 – Defending champions Zambia were knocked out as Chelsea star Victor Moses lifted Nigeria into the quarter-finals with unheralded Burkina Faso joining them at the Africa Cup of Nations Tuesday.Group C finished in thrilling fashion with Moses converting two late penalties to beat Ethiopia 2-0 and put Nigeria into second place behind surprise table-toppers Burkina Faso.last_img read more

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Wenger almost signed Messi at 16

first_imgIncredibly Messi was interested in moving to north London, but the deal was fraught with problems because of issues over the Argentina forward’s work permit.Messi eventually became a Spanish citizen in 2006, but that was three years after Wenger’s audacious attempt to pull off one of the biggest signings in world football.Wenger signed Fabregas after convincing the Spanish midfielder that his progress to the first-team would be quicker.Fabregas, now at Chelsea, made his first team debut for Arsenal in a League Cup game a month after he arrived at the club.At the time he was only 16 and he went on to make more than 200 appearances for the Gunners before he returned to Barcelona in 2011.Messi made his debut for Barcelona when he was 17 years, 114 days old under Frank Rijkaard, but he had to wait until the 2006-07 season before he really established himself as a first choice.By then Fabregas had started a Champions League final against Barcelona at the Stade de France. Messi was on the bench that night alongside Xavi and Andres Iniesta.Pique, meanwhile, moved to Manchester United in 2004. He played just 12 league matches in four years (which included a season on loan at Real Zaragoza) before returning to Barcelona, where he has become the focal point of the defence.-Daily Mail0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000LONDON, October 3- Arsene Wenger came within a whisker of signing Lionel Messi from Barcelona’s La Masia academy when he was just 16.Daily Mail can reveal that Wenger wanted to sign three players in 2003 – Messi, Gerard Pique and Cesc Fabregas – with the promise of playing first-team football in their teens.last_img read more

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Kobe-less Lakers drop third consecutive game

first_imgPhoto Gallery Lakers vs. Knicks NEW YORK – In this city, the show must go on, even if the Lakers were left to play the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden while Kobe Bryant stayed behind at the team hotel overlooking Central Park to serve an NBA suspension. As surprising as Bryant’s one-game suspension was, the end result Tuesday night against the Knicks could not have been more predictable. The Lakers fell 99-94 and now have lost three consecutive games for the first time all season. It was not how the Lakers wanted to open this eight-game road odyssey. Lakers coach Phil Jackson said his team could either come together or fall apart on this trip, the Lakers’. He wasn’t prepared for option No. 3. That had the Lakers learning Tuesday morning that Bryant would be forced to sit out for striking Manu Ginobili in the face on a last-second shot in Sunday’s loss to San Antonio. Just like that, the Lakers were down a third starter against the Knicks. There were no emergency appeals heard either for Bryant with the league office or for the Lakers after they let the game slip away in the fourth quarter and lost – stop if you’ve read this before – to another sub-.500 team this season. New York 99, Lakers 94Today: at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Ch. 9, KLAC/570 Yet Bryant is the NBA’s best fourth-quarter performer, the player who league general managers voted they would most want taking a shot with the game on the line. And there were the Lakers trailing 98-94 in the final 30 seconds Tuesday. Maurice Evans took an open 3-pointer and watched it agonizingly spin around and out. Would Bryant have made that shot instead? The Lakers never will know and weren’t about to ask as the headed to Boston, having lost for the fifth time in six games. “At the end of the game, we just couldn’t close it out,” forward Vladimir Radmanovic said. “Mo had an open shot. Unfortunately, it didn’t go in. But it’s not just Mo’s shot. There’s a lot of things that we didn’t do prior to that shot.” Bryant will be back for tonight’s game against the Celtics. He wasn’t allowed to attend Tuesday’s game at the world’s most famous arena, in accordance with NBA rules. The Lakers had been 3-0 without Bryant this season. They beat Phoenix and Golden State to open the season while Bryant recovered from knee surgery and then dispatched Atlanta while Bryant nursed a sprained ankle. But it was too tall an order to beat the Knicks without Bryant, Kwame Brown and Luke Walton, three-fifths of the starting lineup. The Lakers weren’t a great shooting team either from the field (43.5 percent) or foul line (10 of 17) Tuesday. Radmanovic started his second consecutive game in place of Walton (sprained ankle) and factored into the fourth quarter’s biggest plays. It was Radmanovic’s 3-pointer that started the Lakers’ comeback with 8:08 left and Lamar Odom on the bench. The Lakers trailed by as many as 10 in the final quarter, but Radmanovic connected on another 3 with 45.8 seconds remaining to make it 96-94 after Odom found him in the corner. The two didn’t hesitate in dancing their way back to the bench for a timeout. As it turned out, the celebrating started too early. On the game’s biggest possession, Radmanovic left his man to double-team Eddy Curry as the Knicks got the ball to their center matched up against 19-year-old Andrew Bynum. The Lakers had Curry (27 points) blanketed but Radmanovic fouled him. Curry, a 61 percent free-throw shooter coming into Tuesday, rattled in both foul shots to put the Knicks in front 98-94 with 35.2 seconds to play. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Asked if the Lakers would have won had Bryant played, Jackson answered: “I don’t think about that at all. We think about the fact that we should have made some plays down the stretch.” last_img read more

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Please note

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TO OUR READERS Early editions of Wednesday’s Daily News carried a wire service story that turned out to be an erroneous report that 12 miners in West Virginia were found alive. Shortly before midnight, officials reported all but one miner was dead and headlines reflected that tragic turn of events but the earlier story remained in the paper. We regret the error. Ron Kaye, editorlast_img read more

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Scholarships will help area students bloom

first_imgThe West Valley Garden Club will present college scholarships Tuesday to several local students who plan to study horticulture, floriculture, landscaping or a related field.This year’s winners will are: Bridget Venavides of North Hollywood, a senior at Canoga Park High School; Farah Lee of Chatsworth, a student a Pierce College; Jose Angulo of Santa Clarita, a student at the West Valley Occupational Center; and John Willett of Lake View Terrace, a student at Pierce.The club will also honor its two statewide first-place winners in the Smokey Bear/Woodsy Owl poster contest sponsored by the National Garden Clubs, Inc. and the Department of Agriculture’s Forestry Department. These were Jenniffer Ovalle, a third-grader at Calvert Street Elementary in Woodland Hills, and Kristin Tjosaas, a fifth-grader at Cottonwood Elementary in Palmdale.Their posters are on display at the Platt Branch Library in Woodland Hills and the Palmdale Library in Palmdale. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinals Los Angeles Unified school board President Marlene Canter was named the city’s top female executive by the Los Angeles Business Journal during its recent Women Making a Difference luncheon.Canter worked 30 years as a special education teacher before her election to the board in 2001.Submit Community Column items via e-mail to dnmetro@dailynews.com; fax to (818) 713-0058; or mail to Daily News City Desk, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills 91367. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Chelsea condemn fans who sang anti-Semitic chant

first_img Latest Chelsea News Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Redknapp calls Son ‘petulant’, but Holloway says red card for Rudiger kick was ‘soft’ Just 3 minutes into the game and some @ChelseaFC fans are singing antisemetic chants…it’s embarrassing. It MUST stop! @kickitout— Charlotte Hodges (@CharHodges88) December 13, 2018 targets “We have stated this loud and clear on many occasions from the owner, the board, coaches and players.“Any individuals that can’t summon the brainpower to comprehend this simple message and are found to have shamed the club by used using anti-Semitic or racist words or actions will face the strongest possible action from the club.”The Sterling incident overshadowed Chelsea’s 2-0 Premier League win over last season’s champions City and the latest incident is sure to be investigated by UEFA, who said it is awaiting the referee’s report.Chelsea’s next league game is at Brighton on Sunday, with Alvaro Morata a doubt due to his first-half substitution with a knee injury.Olivier Giroud, Morata’s replacement, scored a free-kick to earn a draw and spare the Blues an embarrassing defeat.Willian’s free-kick had earlier been cancelled out by an Ethan Ampadu own goal, before Vidi took the lead through Loic Nego’s sumptuous volley.On Morata, Sarri said: “The first impression of the doctor (is) maybe it is not a serious injury. But, of course, with this situation we have to wait.”Morata and Giroud have shared the striking responsibilities this season, although Eden Hazard was deployed as a ‘false nine’ in last Saturday’s defeat of Manchester City.The Blues have five remaining matches in December and should Morata be ruled out for any length of time, it would place additional strain on Giroud. Olivier Giroud smashed home a late equaliser for Chelsea Lampard appears to aim dig at Mourinho for handling of Salah and De Bruyne at Chelsea Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea’s 6-0 defeat at Man City REVEALED punished JIBE Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? 2 shining REAL DEAL Chelsea have promised to take the strongest possible action against any supporters found to have sung an anti-Semitic chant during their 2-2 Europa League draw at Vidi on Thursday night.A minority in Budapest were heard chanting offensive songs about Tottenham fans early in the match, featuring anti-Semitic language. Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won REVEALED Real Madrid ‘offer’ Isco to Chelsea in bid to ‘make room’ for Tottenham star gameday cracker Tottenham issue immediate ban to supporter who threw cup at Kepa Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars 1,270 Chelsea fans travelled for the match in Hungary tense 2 OFF The incident came just days after the club and the Metropolitan Police opened investigations into accusations of racist abuse from a supporter at Stamford Bridge towards Manchester City’s Raheem Sterling.Chelsea in January launched a campaign to raise awareness and educate about anti-Semitism in football and the club, including owner Roman Abramovich, who is Jewish, is disgusted at the latest incident.A Chelsea spokesperson said: “Anti-Semitism and any other kind of race-related or religious hatred is abhorrent to this club and the overwhelming majority of our fans.“It has no place at Chelsea or in any of our communities.last_img read more

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