MCI Solutions receives government investment

first_imgJim Morrison of MCI Solutions invented the technology for a solar chemical injection pump which results in zero emissions during the process.. “We’re trying to eliminate and certainly control all of the emissions that come from the chemical injection process in the oil and gas industry,” he explains. “The patent covers a fairly unique technology in that all of the chemical is now contained; it doesn’t leak to the environment.” The product gets rid of the need for venting when injecting chemicals, and greatly reduce harmful emissions. Morrison calls it the “most efficient” pump on the market, as it can “inject the most minute quantities of chemical of anybody in the industry.- Advertisement – Previously, most of the production of the parts of the pump was done elsewhere in Canada, but Morrison wants to start producing in their Fort St. John facility, which will cut costs dramatically. He says that’s what this investment will help them work towards. “The programs to run these machines and optimization of tooling. These kinds of things that you just never get the opportunity to explore and investigate, this money goes to that, and training.”Advertisement In total, the government is investing $80 million over three years into over 600 Canadian companies. MP Bob Zimmer, who announced the funding on behalf of Gary Goodyear, Minister of State (Science and Technology), says that although Canadians want to cut spending, this is one area that’s exempt. “The one thing that we’ve heard loud and clear from Canadians is that we don’t want to cut our R&D funding, so what we’re doing is we’re actually increasing the funding now to projects like Jim’s because we see this as the future,” he says. Mayor Lori Ackerman, Executive Director for Sci-Tech North, the company Morrison credits his company’s existence to, agrees that investing in science and technology is important, and that having local companies succeed helps pave the way for other entrepreneurs. “The future is the knowledge economy,” she argues. “We have intellectual property that is owned here in Fort St. John, so we start creating wealth in the communities and more importantly, the industry. So to have the federal government invest in a company that is here in Fort St. John, not only does it help the company grow, but it also helps others to see that they can move down the line.”Advertisement MCI Solution’s project is expected to be completed by the end of 2013.last_img read more

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NBC late-night hosts to cross writers picket line

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champBoth NBC hosts indicated it was a torturous decision for them to come back, torn by their support for the writers and knowledge that several dozen other staff members would be laid off if the shows remained dark. Some of the late-night stars covered employees’ salaries during the holiday season. Leno said that with talks breaking down and no further negotiations scheduled, he felt it was his responsibility to get his 100 non-writing staff members back to work. Mike Sweeney, chief of the “Late Night” staff of 14 writers, said “we all know what a difficult position Conan is in. He’s been incredibly supportive of us.” Sweeney said he didn’t want to comment on his boss’s decision to come back without the writers. The “Tonight” show’s chief writer, walking the picket line in Burbank, was similarly reluctant to criticize his boss’s decision. “I’m happy that he’s been able to hold out this long,” said Joe Madeiros. “There’s a lot of pressure on late-night hosts.” Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien plan a Jan.2 return with fresh episodes, ending two months of reruns brought on by the writers strike, the network said Monday. But until the strike is settled, the hosts will be on their own. Also on Monday, the union representing striking Hollywood writers denied requests to allow their members to write for the Oscars – Hollywood’s biggest, most glamorous showcase – and the Golden Globes. While late night TV will forge ahead without joke writers, they won’t be far from anyone’s mind. “I will make clear, on the program, my support for the writers and I’ll do the best version of `Late Night’ I can under the circumstances,” O’Brien said in a written statement. “Of course, my show will not be as good. In fact, in moments it may very well be terrible.” Marvin Silbermintz, who has been writing for Leno since 1987, said a “quality” monologue will be tough to produce without writers, but he’s confident Leno can carry the show on his own. “Jay traveled the country doing comedy clubs for years, working the audience,” he said. “NBC forcing Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien back on the air without writers is not going to provide the quality entertainment that the public deserves. The only solution to the strike is a negotiated settlement of the issues,” either by the studio alliance or individual companies, the guild said. The strike has left the nation’s public discourse without a laugh track as the baseball steroid scandal spread, pop stars Amy Winehouse and Britney Spears continued to spiral out of control, and the presidential campaign heated up. NBC’s announcement could make it easier for other programs like Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” or “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” on ABC to return. Also, the WGA is talking about a separate deal with David Letterman’s production company so his CBS show can return with its writers. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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COUNCIL SAYS HELICOPTER UPGRADE PLANS WILL NOT KEEP TOURISTS OFF SLIABH LIAG

first_imgSliabh LiagDonegal County Council has defended its decision to carry out upgrade works to Sliabh Liag during the peak of the summer season saying the majority of visitors will not be affected.Yesterday the council revealed it is closing parts of the iconic tourist attraction for a week from August 18th to upgrade walkways.A helicopter will carry in more than 500 tonnes of stone to upgrade the walks at the site. Local TD Thomas Pringle slammed the move and said the council should wait until September at least to carry out the works.But the council has now assured the public that the necessary works will not have a major impact on tourists.A statement said “Donegal County Council wishes to stress that the works and the closure of these sections of path will have no impact on the majority of visitors to Sliabh Liag as the upper car park and viewing areas at Bunglas which are the destination for the majority of visitors to Sliabh Liag will remain open at all times during the helicopter lifting operations.“The helicopter lifting operations have been arranged in consultation with stakeholders including the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Mountaineering Ireland, local hill walking groups and others. “The exclusion areas have been designed to minimise both risks to the public whilst also minimising the impact on visitors to the area and affected businesses.”The council added that the works are scheduled in line with weather – a claim disputed by Deputy Pringle who claims there will be very little difference in carrying them out a month later.He has appealed to the council to reconsider and reschedule their plans in Autumn saying Donegal tourism realistically has a six week period. COUNCIL SAYS HELICOPTER UPGRADE PLANS WILL NOT KEEP TOURISTS OFF SLIABH LIAG was last modified: August 9th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:councildonegalsliabh liagstoneThomas Pringleupgradewalkwayslast_img read more

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Washington County Inmate Roster – 9-21-18

first_imgSeptember 18Indiana State Police  Christopher Brian Jackey, 36, Salem Melissa L. McCubbins, 34, Salem Maintaining a Common NuisanceUnlawful Possession of a Legend DrugPossession of Marijuana, Hash Oil, Hashish or SalviaSeptember 19City of Salem Police John C. Carnes, 46, Louisville Failure to AppearFailure to Appear Domestic BatteryBecky Lou Ayers, 44, Salemcenter_img Violation of Failure to Comply with pre-trial diversion agreementWashington County Sheriff’s DepartmentThomas S. Fox, 51, Seymour Aiding in dealing methInvasion of Privacy TheftSeptember 20Indiana State Police Luther D. Helms, 58, Pekinlast_img read more

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Two Vehicle Accident Sends an Indiana State Police Capitol Officer to the Hospital

first_imgThe crash impact caused Officer Meneely’s car to spin, coming to rest in the eastbound lane of 8th Avenue.  Shelton’s vehicle left the roadway and came to a stop on the south side of 8th Avenue.  Officer Meneely was transported from the crash scene, via ambulance, to Union Hospital.  He suffered non-life threatening injuries.  Shelton was not injured from the accident.Drugs and alcohol are not a factor in the accident.Trooper Hall was assisted at the crash scene by Putnamville State Police Officers Sergeant Joe Rutledge, Sergeant Kris Fitzgerald, Master Trooper Chip McKee, Master Trooper Todd Brown and Senior Trooper Tim Radar. This evening at approximately 5:40 p.m., an Indiana State Police Capitol Officer was involved in a two-vehicle accident at 8th Avenue and North 30th Street, in Terre Haute, in which the Capitol Officer was injured. The preliminary crash investigation by Trooper Kyle Hall of the Putnamville Post revealed that Shae A. Shelton, age 19, of Terre Haute, IN, was driving a 2013 Chrysler 200 southbound on North 30th Street. Shelton failed to observe a 2015 Dodge Charger, traveling westbound on 8th Avenue, driven by Indiana State Police Capitol Officer Charles D. Meneely Jr., 38, also of Terre Haute.  Shelton pulled into the westbound lane of 8th Avenue, directly into the path of Officer Meneely, and was struck by his 2015 Dodge Charger.last_img read more

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How to Fix Your Router, According to McSweeney’s

first_imgI am a big fan of David Eggers, first having come across his A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, part novel, part autobiography, several years. Since then the man has become a paragon of bringing good writing to the children of various inner cities with his 826 Valencia projects (where I once volunteered, name after the initial effort’s address in San Francisco), starting up a quarterly literary magazine called McSweeney’s, a book imprint, and the quirky but always interesting website.This week online one can find the article In Which I Fix My Girlfriend’s Grandparent’s Wifi and am Hailed as a Conquering Hero, a short piece of fiction that just speaks volumes to me. I thought you would enjoy it as well.As many of you have been called upon to fix some relative or friend’s computer problem, it is nice to see the “conquering hero” become part of our mainstream collective consciousness. Or just fun to read.Here is Eggers at a Ted Talk:As you start to delve into the Eggers universe, you will find things that will delight and annoy you, but are always fascinating and just great writing. As someone who makes a living putting words on screen, this universe is a thing of beauty and a joy to behold. I strong urge you to sample more of what you can find with some of the links above. You will be glad you did, and a great way to spend a wintery weekend. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img david strom Tags:#humor#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

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Asia is the cradle of almost every cholera epidemic, genome studies show

first_img In the 1970s, however, Rita Colwell of the University of Maryland in College Park suggested that outbreaks could originate in the local environment. She showed that V. cholerae lives in many rivers and coastal waters, including the Chesapeake Bay, a large estuary on the east coast of the United States. The bacteria attach themselves to plankton; Colwell argued that when climatic events such as El Niño trigger plankton blooms, cholera can erupt in areas with bad sanitation. Climate change could make such outbreaks more frequent, she warned.Since then experts have debated how many big cholera outbreaks are caused by such local events rather than brought in by travelers. “The community has been completely fractured by this,” says Nicholas Thomson, a researcher at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton, U.K. Some have proposed combinations of the two scenarios; Africa, for instance, has had about a dozen big outbreaks in the past 50 years, and one theory holds that an Asian strain of V. cholerae was introduced once and then established itself in the environment, says Marco Salemi, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Florida’s Emerging Pathogens Institute in Gainesville. Imported microbes could also swap genes with local populations to create new strains. “If you spent time going though all the literature, you’d simply be confused,” Thomson says. Cholera’s travels The two major cholera epidemics that occurred in the Americas in the past 50 years were both caused by imported strains. So were 11 African epidemics. (GRAPHIC) J. YOU/SCIENCE; (DATA) D. DOMMAN ET AL. To solve the problem, Thomson and an international team of researchers spent years assembling a collection of 714 bacterial isolates spanning half a century in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. They sequenced all of them and compared the genomes, along with hundreds more that had been published before.The picture that emerged is strikingly clear. The Americas have seen two major cholera outbreaks in the past half-century: one that began in Peru and raced through almost all of Latin America between 1991 and 1993, and another in Haiti that started in 2010 and is ongoing. The analysis confirms previous strong evidence that the Haiti outbreak was inadvertently introduced by United Nations peacekeepers from Nepal, and it shows that the ’90s outbreak was also caused by Asian strains, both introduced in 1991. One arrived in Peru by way of Africa, and the other landed in Mexico, having traveled from southern Asia, possibly via Eastern Europe. In Africa, the researchers could pinpoint 11 separate introductions of cholera from Asia that went on to cause massive outbreaks. Local strains did sometimes cause disease in both Africa and Latin America, but none led to an explosive epidemic.The two papers “make the environmental hypothesis untenable, at least in the form that has been most aggressively promoted,” says microbiologist John Mekalanos of Harvard Medical School in Boston. “I certainly hope this puts this theory to rest.” Salemi says he was surprised by the results, particularly in Africa. “I would have expected to see more locally generated outbreaks,” he says, but “the analysis they do and the data they show are very clear.”Colwell—whose cholera research and advocacy for clean water have earned her many plaudits, including the National Medal of Science—told Science she did not want to publicly discuss the new research. Colwell says she has been “treated terribly” by her opponents in the long-running debate: “I’ve had 30 years of being dumped on and I don’t want to be dumped on anymore.” In perhaps the most famous example of shoe-leather epidemiology, U.K. physician John Snow mapped cholera cases in London in 1854 to pinpoint a water pump on Broad Street as the likely source of a deadly outbreak. Removing the pump handle helped stop its spread. Now, scientists have done similar detective work on a global scale, using 21st-century techniques. By sequencing and comparing hundreds of bacterial genomes, they have shown that all of the explosive epidemics of cholera in Africa and the Americas in the past half-century arose after the arrival of new strains that had evolved in Asia.The work, published in two Science papers this week, could put to rest an old debate about the role of environmental factors in cholera’s global burden. It could also have a big impact on the battle against the disease, because it allows public health officials to concentrate their efforts on the imported strains that are likely to be the most dangerous. And it suggests there is no local reservoir for major outbreaks in Africa or the Americas, which means “elimination of cholera in these places is completely achievable,” says Dominique Legros, a cholera expert at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland. “This is music to my ears.”Cholera is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which spreads through water contaminated with feces. Over the centuries, dangerous strains of the bacterium appear to have spread from Asia to the rest of the world in several waves. The latest, called the seventh pandemic, began in 1961 and is ongoing, causing an estimated 3 million cases each year.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) A 3-year-old boy is treated for cholera in Iquitos, Peru, in 1991, in an epidemic that affected most of Latin America.center_img Last month, WHO unveiled a plan to cut cholera deaths by 90% by 2030 by improving access to safe drinking water and by deploying an oral cholera vaccine, a stockpile of which was created in 2013. The new research will help those efforts, Legros says. When a new cholera case appears, researchers can now sequence the bacterium to determine whether it belongs to the pandemic lineage from Asia. That could help pinpoint truly dangerous outbreaks that most warrant use of the limited vaccine stocks, Thomson says: “The simple fact that you can now distinguish this form from all other cholera means that we have a chance to do something about it.”But the research also highlights the importance of eliminating natural reservoirs of pandemic V. cholerae in Asia. “If we want to control cholera at the global level, we must control it in that part of the world,” Legros says. Something in the region allows new strains to evolve and spread across the world, and scientists aren’t sure what it is. “The ecology there is almost certainly different from elsewhere,” Thomson says. It’s as if scientists have identified the pump, but not yet a handle they can pull. ALEJANDRO BALANGUER/AP IMAGES By Kai KupferschmidtNov. 9, 2017 , 2:00 PM Asia is the cradle of almost every cholera epidemic, genome studies showlast_img read more

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Gene-edited foods are safe, Japanese panel concludes

first_img Japan will allow gene-edited foodstuffs to be sold to consumers without safety evaluations as long as the techniques involved meet certain criteria, if recommendations agreed on by an advisory panel yesterday are adopted by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. This would open the door to using CRISPR and other techniques on plants and animals intended for human consumption in the country.“There is little difference between traditional breeding methods and gene editing in terms of safety,” Hirohito Sone, an endocrinologist at Niigata University who chaired the expert panel, told NHK, Japan’s national public broadcaster.How to regulate gene-edited food is a hotly debated issue internationally. Scientists and regulators have recognized a difference between genetic modification, which typically involves transferring a gene from one organism to another, and gene editing, in which certain genes within an organism are disabled or altered using new techniques such as CRISPR. That’s why a year ago, the U.S.Department of Agriculture concluded that most gene-edited foods would not need regulation. But the European Union’s Court of Justice ruled in July 2018 that gene-edited crops must go through the same lengthy approval process as traditional transgenic plants. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) In Japan, genetically modified products have to be labeled; an advisory panel did not say whether that should apply to gene-edited food as well. Gene-edited foods are safe, Japanese panel concludes Shiho Fukada/Bloomberg/Getty Images center_img By Dennis NormileMar. 19, 2019 , 1:15 PM Now, Japan appears set to follow the U.S. example. The final report, approved yesterday, was not immediately available, but an earlier draft was posted on the ministry website. The report says no safety screening should be required provided the techniques used do not leave foreign genes or parts of genes in the target organism. In light of that objective, the panel concluded it would be reasonable to require information on the editing technique, the genes targeted for modification, and other details from developers or users that would be made public while respecting proprietary information.The recommendations leave open the possibility of requiring safety evaluations if there are insufficient details on the editing technique. The draft report does not directly tackle the issue of whether such foods should be labeled. The ministry is expected to largely follow the recommendations in finalizing a policy on gene-edited foods later this year.Consumer groups had voiced opposition to the draft recommendations, which were released for public comment in December 2018. Using the slogan “No need for genetically modified food!” the Consumers Union of Japan joined other groups circulating a petition calling for regulating the cultivation of all gene-edited crops, and safety reviews and labeling of all gene-edited foods.Whether consumers will embrace the new technology remains to be seen. Japan has approved the sale of genetically modified (GM) foods that have passed safety tests as long as they are labeled. But public wariness has limited consumption and has led most Japanese farmers to shun GM crops. The country does import sizable volumes of GM processed food and livestock feed, however. Japanese researchers are reportedly working on gene-edited potatoes, tomatoes, rice, chicken, and fish. “Thorough explanations [of the new technologies] are needed to ease public concerns,” Sone said.*Correction, 22 March, 3:25 p.m.: This story has been updated to note that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, not the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, decided not to regulate gene-edited foods.last_img read more

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